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People: News Obits

This category contains 34 posts

Joe Kanuka, Lawyer

Not too many of us get named to two Halls of Fame.  Joe Kanuka, an architect of the Western Canada Lottery Corporation, made major contributions to both transportation law and amateur sports.

A Saskatchewan stalwart left his mark on fields and roads – The Globe and Mail

Randell Morris, Educator

Without an affluent Aboriginal community, warned economics professor Eric Howe, “That million-dollar house in Saskatoon Stonebridge or the equivalent Regina neighbourhood won’t be worth a million dollars by the time you sell it.”

Randell Morris, a great guy who also achieved great results, improved the economic outlook for First Nations people, and for all the rest of us.

“College president worked tirelessly to improve lives of Saskatchewan first nations” – Globe and Mail

Muhammad Haque, Doctor and Muslim Community Leader

Though his final dream eluded him, Muhammad Haque accomplished much in his life, and built peace within and beyond the Muslim community.

Muslim leader fostered a community – The Globe and Mail

Colin MacPherson, Butler

As a butler in grand diplomatic houses, Colin MacPherson could do everything from care for the wardrobe to whip up dinner for 60, all in inimitable style.  And he always — well, almost always — kept his personal opinions to himself.

A perfect practitioner of a waning profession – The Globe and Mail

Jim Glass, Aviation Entrepreneur

A small businessman who dreamed big, Jim Glass transcended a “Hatfields and McCoys” family rivalry to create Transwest Air.

From washing planes to building one of Canada’s largest regional carriers – The Globe and Mail

Lillian Meneilly, Liberated Woman

In an era when men and women occupied largely separate spheres, Lillian Meneilly excelled in everything from hockey and car repair to baking and office management.

Career-focused Prairie mom was ahead of her time – Globe and Mail

Bill Hanson, Aboriginal Economic Development Consultant

After forging his own path “from the trapline to online,” Bill Hanson used his depth of experience to re-imagine aboriginal employment and economic development.

Understanding both worlds made him a key link between government, natives – The Globe and Mail

Konrad Haderlein, Professor

A dashing character with a fencing scar on his face, who wore cape and top hat to the symphony, and cowed lesser mortals with his forceful personality and immense learning, Konrad Haderlein loved language, literature and the Canadian prairie.

Konrad Haderlein was just passing through when he fell for the Prairies – Globe and Mail

Daisy Junor, Athlete

One of the real-life inspirations for A League of their Own, Daisy Junor was an all-around athlete who was still receiving requests for her baseball card and autograph when she died at 92.

Pro baseball player in league of her own, went on to excel at bowling, golf – The Globe and Mail

Dave Mallough, Crop Scientist

He saved the fledgling canola industry.  He set out to help save — or, depending on your perspective, further sabotage — Tanzania when it staggered under food shortages and foreign debt.

Saskatchewan native rescued export market for canola industry – Globe and Mail


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